NASDAQ Tumble Through Just 5 Stocks.

When it comes to the ongoing technology beat-down in the stock market, it appears not all shares are created equal.

Indeed, just five names account for nearly 75 percent of the drop in the Nasdaq Composite Index, which has fallen more than 2.1 percent since June 7. Meanwhile, the Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 Index are roughly unchanged over the same time frame.

Much of this dynamic is due to giants like Apple Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Goggle parent Alphabet Inc. falling as much as 6.5 percent. Add Facebook and Amazon to the mix and those companies account for nearly 30 percent of the index’s weighting, and their outsize impact has driven the gauge lower even though the bulk of the stocks are doing fine.

This selloff was “way overdue given the extreme out-performance and positioning in technology shares,” Morgan Stanley analyst Michael Wilson wrote in a note to clients Monday, Shares of Apple, for instance, are still up 25 percent this year, giving them room to fall.

But while Wilson expects the drubbing to continue in the short-term, he doesn’t think the market has seen a peak in tech shares.

“We would be surprised if this is the end for technology stocks given the very strong earnings growth we are witnessing,” he wrote.

Analysts now believe performance in technology will depend on the economic outlook. And if conditions change, finance will be the likely beneficiary.

“If the current economic ‘Goldilocks’ environment persists, technology and other growth stocks should continue to outperform, despite today’s price declines,” Goldman Sachs Group Inc. analysts led by David Kostin wrote in a note to clients late Friday. “However, if investors recalibrate expectations for inflation and Fed policy to match the growth optimism suggested by the S&P 500 level, higher rates should lead to financial sector outperformance.”

Cheerio.

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

 

UK OK ?

The U.K. could suffer another ratings downgrade after a General Election led to a hung parliament, Moritz Kraemer, sovereign chief ratings officer at S&P Global, said on Friday.

The U.K. lost its triple A rating after the country voted to leave the European Union in June of last year. S&P said at the time that it was worried the decision would lead to a deterioration of the U.K.’s economic performance and institutional framework.

Kraemer said on Friday that the latest election outcome proves the rating update was correct and further ones could be on the way.

“We have the outlook on the ratings still on negative indicating that further downgrade or downgrades could be in the wings going forward,” he said.

“This depends pretty much on the further outcome of the Brexit negotiations and the reality that the U.K. will face outside the EU, which is still uncertain,” Kraemer added.

Brexit talks, which were due to begin in a couple of weeks, are set to be delayed until the U.K. has a new government in place. The associated uncertainty could hurt the country’s economy by further derailing investment decisions.

Kramer noted that this was the second unnecessary referendum/election in the U.K. “This is quite a track record,” he said.

The upcoming decisions of U.K. lawmakers will be closely watched. Kathrin Muehlbronner, a Moody’s senior vice president and lead U.K. sovereign analyst, said via email: “Moody’s is monitoring the U.K.’s process of forming a new government and will assess the credit implications in due course.”

“As previously stated, the future path of the U.K. sovereign rating will be largely driven by two factors: first, the outcome of the U.K.’s negotiations on leaving the European Union and the implications this has for the country’s growth outlook; Second, fiscal developments, given the country’s fiscal deficit and rising public debt,” she added.

The outcome of the election also seemed to indicate that voters are tired of austerity policies.

Cheerio

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd

Call Options Whatever You Want

Traders are buying so many S&P 500 call options right now that the ratio of those contracts to put options hit an all-time high Wednesday, according to Credit Suisse.

A call option is the right to acquire a stock in the future at a preset price. A put option is the right to sell.

“The biggest trend, the most notable thing, is the resumption of the call buying in the S&P,” said Mandy Xu, derivatives strategist at Credit Suisse. With “Trump coming out with a new tax plan, we’ve seen that upside demand in the market.”

Xu calls this ratio the “call skew” and here’s the chart the bank sent clients Wednesday showing the metric at a record level.

The jump in the ratio of call-to-put buyers came ahead of the Trump administration’s afternoon announcement on a highly anticipated tax proposal.

Call skew began climbing after the November U.S. presidential election, and the last time call skew hit a record was Feb. 14, Xu said. The S&P 500 climbed about 3 percent in the following days before setting its most recent closing record on March 1.

Stocks and call skew levels then dropped as Republicans pulled their health-care bill, creating worries about whether market-friendly tax reform would be passed. Growing concerns about geopolitical tensions from North Korea to anti-EU sentiment in France also pressured stocks.

So far this week, the S&P 500 has rallied nearly 2 percent after the first round of a French presidential election on Sunday that showed centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron remaining the favorite against far-right populist candidate Marine Le Pen.

That said, stocks don’t have an all-clear signal. Congress has yet to vote on tax reform, while overseas surprises could rock markets again.

Xu also thinks the bullish bet from call options buyers is probably near its limit around these record levels.

“It’s pretty extreme as it is. In order for it to go higher we probably need something more concrete or substantial to extend that,” she said.

But that’s obviously not the whole Options story. S&P 500 is but one vehicle amongst a myriad of many such as commodities and metals with both Gold and Silver looking attractive right now. Oil – well, nah.

Cheerio.

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

China One Way – US The Other.

The Chinese and U.S. stock markets are going in opposite directions.

An intensifying crackdown against leverage in Asia’s biggest economy has rocked the hither-to unflappable Shanghai Composite Index over the past week, sending it to a three-month low last session. In the U.S., the largest equity market is embracing a risk rally spurred by the French election, with the S&P 500 Index continuing to build on reflation-trade gains ignited by Donald Trump’s November victory.

The divergence means the two markets are the least in tune since August 2008 — just before the collapse of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. unleashed chaos on the global financial system.

Chinese officials have mainly kept mainland stocks on a tight rein after routs in mid-2015 and the start of 2016 reverberated through world financial markets. Until Monday’s 1.4 percent slump, the Shanghai Composite Index hadn’t fallen more than 1 percent for 86 trading days.

As Beijing’s focus on reducing risk in the financial system shifted from money-market tightening and reducing leverage to containing speculation and irregular trading, the two markets starting moving in opposite directions in the past month.

In one sense, it’s a sign that investors overseas aren’t as worried about Chinese market ructions as they were in previous years — perhaps partly thanks to underlying strength in China’s economy. Given how mainland stocks have become increasingly linked to global markets, however, the divergence may prove to be a short-term phenomenon, according to Daniel So, a strategist at CMB International Securities Ltd. in Hong Kong.

“The Chinese government is squeezing speculation out of the market and while investors adjust, it will inevitably lag behind other parts of the world,” So said.

For now, the split with the U.S. is particularly marked, with the Shanghai Composite’s 30-day correlation with the Bank of New York Mellon index of Chinese American depository receipts approaching zero. The Chinese ADR market — dominated by technology companies like Alibaba Group has climbed 8.6 percent since Trump was elected U.S. president, while the state-company-led Shanghai Composite is down 0.6 percent.

China’s deleveraging drive and the renewed focus on market irregularities have put the mainland share market into a “bad mood,” but officials aren’t likely to tolerate a lot of instability ahead of the Communist Party’s twice-a-decade leadership reshuffle later this year, said George Magnus, a former adviser to UBS Group AG and current associate at the University of Oxford’s China Centre.

‘Minimum Necessary’

“The authorities are trying to calm down leverage and housing at the margin but will not go any further than the minimum necessary,” he said. “If it looks as though regulatory tightening is delivering unfavorable outcomes, and risks any form of instability, you won’t be able to say the world ‘backtrack’ fast enough.”

As long as growth remains stable, though, the regulatory moves may continue. That would be good for the economy over the longer term, said Alex Wolf, a Hong Kong-based senior emerging markets economist at Standard Life Investments Ltd. “Successful efforts at deleveraging and reducing credit to nonbank financial institutions can reduce overall systemic risk.”

Two months ago, Chinese markets were a picture of calm , with mainland stock volatility near the lowest since 2014 and bond yields falling as money-market rates subsided. Tuesday, the Shanghai Composite closed up less than 0.2 percent, after sinking 2.3 percent last week.

For Adrian Zuercher, head of Asia Pacific asset allocation at UBS’s private banking arm in Hong Kong, the weaker relationship between Chinese shares and other markets is a good thing, and is likely to become more marked.

“All these regulations that are taking place are done in a way that should make China less risky,” he said. “The economy is on a solid footing and that’s why they can do some of the measures. We will probably see more international investors coming into China on the fixed income and equity side.”

Cheerio.

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.