Low Oil

Oil traded near the lowest closing level in seven months as U.S. gasoline supplies unexpectedly rose for a second week.

Futures were little changed in New York after slumping 3.7 percent Wednesday, the first drop in four sessions. Motor-fuel stockpiles expanded by 2.1 million barrels last week, the Energy Information Administration reported. Most analysts surveyed by Bloomberg had forecast a decline. Crude output climbed while nationwide inventories fell less than predicted.

Oil has declined almost 8 percent this month amid speculation that rising U.S. supplies will offset output curbs by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, including Russia. New production from OPEC rivals will be more than enough to meet demand growth next year, the International Energy Agency said Wednesday in its first forecast for 2018.

“Any build in U.S. commercial stocks gives us an indication of the uphill battle OPEC is facing,” said Tamas Varga, an analyst at PVM Oil Associates Ltd. in London. “Although last week the big bearish surprise came in the form of significant builds across the board, this time around gasoline was responsible for the consequences.”

West Texas Intermediate for July delivery was at $44.70 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange, down 3 cents, at 10:01 a.m. London time. Total volume traded was about 46 percent above the 100-day average. Prices dropped $1.73 to $44.73 on Wednesday, the lowest close since Nov. 14.

Brent for August settlement was up 10 cents at $47.10 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe exchange. Prices slid $1.72, or 3.5 percent, to $47 on Wednesday. The global benchmark crude traded at a premium of $2.14 to August WTI.

U.S. crude stockpiles dropped by 1.66 million barrels last week, the EIA reported Wednesday. Inventories were forecast to decline by 2.45 million, according to the median estimate in a Bloomberg survey. Production rose by 12,000 barrels a day to 9.33 million barrels a day.

Oil-market news:

  • The Qatar crisis is reverberating in Libya, inflaming political divisions in the war-torn oil exporter and dragging commodity-trading giant Glencore Plc into a dispute over crude sales.
  • Iraq is driving up crude-oil exports to the U.S., the world’s second-biggest import market, just as there are signs Saudi Arabia is honoring a pledge to restrict such deliveries, according to tanker-tracking data.

Cheerio

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

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New IPO

The Irish government’s sale of part of its stake in Allied Irish Banks Plc came a step closer last week. On Thursday in Dublin, the finance ministry appointed another group of banks to help in what could be the biggest listing on the London and Irish stock exchanges this year.

How much of AIB will be sold?

The government hopes to recoup about 3 billion euros ($3.3 billion) or more from selling 25 percent of AIB, which had to be rescued by the state during the financial crisis. Including the so-called greenshoe, about 27 percent of the lender could be sold. The government owns 99.9 percent of the bank, and Finance Minister Michael Noonan has said it may take a decade to return the bank fully to private hands.

When is the IPO going to happen?

Noonan has indicated the sale could take place in May or June. If that’s delayed, the next window is probably in the fall. Noonan has consistently said the determining factor will be maximizing value from the sale, and the state of the wider market will play a key role. The Bloomberg Europe Banks and Financial Services Index has risen 28 percent over the last six months. That rally has stalled in recent weeks, and privately, government officials insist they won’t be rushed into a sale.

What is AIB worth?

The agency that manages the government’s shareholding, the Irish Strategic Investment Fund, valued AIB at 11.3 billion euros in February. That was before the bank released its 2016 results, including a pretax profit of 1.7 billion euros and a reinstated dividend, and government officials view the February valuation as low.

How will the sale be priced?

A tiny sliver of AIB’s shares is still traded on the junior Dublin market. These are so thinly traded, they aren’t considered a particularly useful measure of the bank’s value. As ever, the price will be determined by demand, and early soundings indicate demand will be strong. AIB is viewed as a proxy for the Irish economy, which is growing at twice the pace of the euro-region. The bank is the biggest player in the Irish mortgage market, with about 35 percent of new lending. A valuation of about 12 billion euros would suggest a price of around 4.50 euros per share.

Cheerio

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd