Run Euro Run !

The euro’s rally may have only just begun.

While the European Central Bank made few changes Thursday to its forward guidance and Mario Draghi said that policy makers were still waiting for wages and prices to match the region’s improving economic growth, the common currency rallied to its highest level in nearly two years.

It’s the best performer among Group-of-10 currencies this year and could still have further to run with the bank likely to announce the scaling back of its quantitative easing program in either September or October.

“It’s an armor-plated rally and it won’t stop,” Peter Kinsella, a London-based senior foreign exchange and rates strategist at Commonwealth Bank of Australia, wrote in a note. “Everything speaks in favor of further EUR appreciation — increasing portfolio inflows, changing monetary policy, improved political risks.”

Increased hawkishness from the central bank, spurred by Draghi saying that reflationary forces had replaced deflationary ones on the continent, has helped the euro rally from lows last seen near the start of the millennium. Investors expect the ECB to start tapering in the new year and are pricing in a 10 basis point rate hike by September 2018.

At the same time, political risks have largely dissipated. The victory of market-friendly Emmanuel Macron in France allayed fears after a populist wave swept through the European Union following the Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump as president of the U.S. Economic growth has also picked up, helping to buoy investor prospects.

The euro broke through $1.16 after Draghi said that the currency’s recent re-pricing had received “some attention,” without specifically saying he was concerned about its strength, at the press conference following July’s ECB decision. That reference helped boost the shared currency, while European bonds rallied following the meeting led by those of Spain and Portugal.

Mario Draghi “essentially did not push back on the market pricing, which was the key point,” said Jordan Rochester, foreign-exchange strategist at Nomura International in London. “The Fed was moving more aggressively in terms of their monetary policy while other banks were still easing. All that’s come into reverse now,” he added, referring to the Federal Reserve’s recent rate hikes.

The euro advanced 0.1 percent to $1.1642 as of 8:49 a.m. in London, having touched $1.1677, its highest since August 2015. The currency has climbed about 11 percent this year, partly on speculation that a tapering of bond purchases is drawing closer. It traded near its highest versus the pound in eight months with one euro worth 89.59 pence.

Nomura currently forecasts the euro at $1.15 by the end of the year. “In the short-term we’re overshooting and I wouldn’t fight it,” Rochester said.

For some analysts, the only thing that can stop a prolonged euro surge is events on the other side of the Atlantic. That could come in the form of progress of U.S. tax reform, according to Rochester.

“One factor that might stop the euro rally from here is a repricing of expectations for the Federal Reserve,” said Andrew Cormack, a London-based money manager at Western Asset Global Management. “There is so little priced for the Fed now any upside surprise in the data could see this reverse.”

Cheerio

The Wig and Pen Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd

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UK Election : What Could It Mean To You.

U.K.’s citizens have just voted their next set of Parliament members.

What were the results and why should traders care? Here are a couple of answers:

Why did Theresa May call for snap elections anyway?

Back in mid-April, Prime Minister Theresa May called for a snap election despite her promises to wait for the May 2020 scheduled elections. The plan was to capitalize on her (and her party’s) popularity and strengthen their numbers ahead of the crucial Brexit negotiations.

Back then the Conservative Party held 330 seats, just a smidge above the 326 required to form a majority in the 650 seats of the Lower House. The Labour Party came in second (229 seats), followed by the Scottish National Party (54) and the Liberal Democrats (9).

The pound rallied at her announcement as market players and their cats had bet on a landslide win for the Tories, with polls attributing double-digit leads against the next party.

Did May’s gamble pay off?

Not even a little bit. In the weeks that followed, May’s hard stance on Brexit, two terror attacks in the U.K., a few REALLY unpopular bits in the Conservative Party manifesto, and hard campaigning from her opponents have pulled the Tories’ lead down to uncomfortable levels.

Fast forward to Election Day and now May’s party has…more regrets than seats in the Parliament.

With a voter turnout of 68.7% – the highest since 1997 – and only one more constituency left undeclared, Theresa May’s Conservative Party is expected to snag 318 seats in the Parliament, 12 fewer than when she called for the elections.

The Labour Party is expected to get 261 seats (+31 seats) while the Liberal Democrats (12) and Democratic Unionist Party (10) also added to their numbers. The Scottish National Party (35) also lost seats, though.

What does this mean for the government?

In a word, trouble. With no party reaching parliamentary majority, the U.K. officially has a “hung Parliament.”

Basically, having a hung Parliament means that it will be harder for the MPs to reach decisions. But as leader of the party with the most seats, May will be given a choice if she wants to (a) form a coalition or (b) run a minority government.

Forming a coalition means teaming up Survival-style to get the required 326 votes. In this scenario the Tories would sign a formal coalition as PM David Cameron did with the Liberal Democrats in 2010. The Tories would have to give up control, though, and likely give Cabinet positions to the other party.

Or they could choose to run a minority government and enter into “confidence and supply” agreements, wherein a small party or independent MPs will “supply” their votes on bills and “confidence” votes in exchange for progress for their pet causes.

What does this mean for Brexit negotiations?

More trouble. Remember that May wanted to reinforce their numbers to improve her bargaining position with the EU and increase chances of a “good deal” for Britain. If you recall, she has said that “no deal is better than a bad deal.”

But with the Conservative Party not even getting majority, things just got a lot harder for May. Not only does she have to soften some of her stances (not all Tories are in favor of a hard Brexit), but she might have to scrap some of her plans altogether.

The lack of majority could also lead to delays in the Brexit negotiations. Formal talks was scheduled to start on June 19 but already EU’s Chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier tweeted:

“Brexit negotiations should start when UK is ready; timetable and EU positions are clear. Let’s put our minds together on striking a deal.”

Recall that Britain has already officially triggered Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty. This means that they have two years to negotiate their way out of the EU. Tick tock.

Any other surprises?

As you can see on the chart above, Nicola Sturgeon’s Scottish National Party also lost bigly. More importantly, Alex Salmond – Sturgeon’s deputy, mentor, and a key SNP member, has lost his seat in Gordon.

This means that we won’t see a second Scottish referendum anytime soon. Already Sturgeon has shared that she would “properly think” about whether to press ahead with Referendum 2.0 after the Tories enjoyed their best performance in Scotland since 1983.

Nick Clegg, THE leader of the Lib Dems in 2010 and former Deputy Prime Minister, also lost his seat in Sheffield Hallam to Jared O’Hara of the Labour party. Yikes!

How did the markets react?

The pound took its hardest hit when exit polls – which have been good predictors of actual results – pointed to a hung parliament.

The currency also dropped by its sharpest since the EU referendum and made new lows while the final tallies were shaping up. However, it also saw retracements at the start of the London session.

FTSE 100, which includes companies that would profit from a weaker pound, opened higher today. Meanwhile, FTSE 250, which has more local companies, are marginally lower on the day.

It’s also interesting to note that utilities companies are among the biggest winners today. One possible reason is that the lack of majority would mean that the Labour Party won’t likely push through with nationalizing them while Theresa May can’t cap their bills either.

What now?

PM May revealed that she has seen the Queen and has formally asked permission to form a government.

Apparently, she’s now teaming up with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) to form a coalition in time for the start of Brexit negotiations AND the opening of the new Parliamentin 10 days.

Thing is, the DUP isn’t a fan of a “hard Brexit.” DUP founder Arlene Foster once shared that “No one wants to see a hard Brexit,” adding that “no one wants to see a hard border.”

This means that, unless May convinces Foster and her gang to come over to the “hard” side, then we’ll likely see a toned down version of May’s initial Brexit plans.

Cheerio

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

 

Global Round Up

Here are some of the key events coming up:

  • More Fed officials will be speaking as the FOMC’s June 13-14 meeting approaches. Robert Kaplan will be in New York on Wednesday.
  • The U.S. jobs report Friday may bolster the case for a rate hike, with a gain of 180,000 positions expected.
  • Brazil’s central-bank decision Wednesday will probably see a cut of 75 to 100 basis points from the current 11.25 percent, according to economists.
  • The EIA is due to release its monthly supply reports Wednesday.

Here are the main movers in markets:

Stocks

  • The MSCI Asia Pacific Index dropped less than 0.1 percent, paring its advance for May to 2.6 percent. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index fell 0.1 percent, trimming a monthly gain to 0.8 percent.
  • The Shanghai Composite rose 0.2 percent, after nearly wiping out an earlier gain of 1.1 percent. The manufacturing purchasing managers index remained at 51.2 for a second straight month in May, compared with a median estimate of 51 in a Bloomberg survey of economists.
  • Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was flat, heading for a fifth straight monthly gain, the longest winning streak since 2013, as improving earnings outweighed concerns about China’s campaign to cut leverage.
  • Japan’s Topix fell 0.3 percent, following two days of gains.
  • Futures on the S&P 500 rose 0.1 percent. The benchmark index slipped 0.1 percent Tuesday, retreating for the first time in eight days. The Nasdaq 100 Index advanced for an eighth day to an all-time high.

Currencies

  • The pound dropped 0.3 percent to $1.2817. The euro was little changed, heading for a monthly gain of 2.7 percent, its best performance in more than a year.
  • The yen weakened 0.1 percent to 110.93 per dollar after rising 0.4 percent Tuesday. The South African rand strengthened 0.4 percent, after tumbling for two days.
  • The onshore yuan climbed 0.4 percent, poised for its highest closing level since November.
  • The Bloomberg Dollar Spot Index was little changed for a third straight day. The gauge is down 1.3 percent for the month.

Commodities

  • Iron-ore futures in Dalian fell 5.4 percent to 429.5 yuan a ton, the lowest since Nov. 7.
  • Gold was little changed at $1,262.69 an ounce, extending a 0.4 percent loss Tuesday.
  • Oil dropped 0.6 percent to $49.35 a barrel after retreating 0.3 percent in the previous session. OPEC and Russia’s deal last week to extend output limits through March was met with a selloff as it didn’t include deeper cuts, a plan for the rest of 2018 or a new ally.

Bonds

  • The yield on 10-year Treasuries rose two basis point to 2.23 percent, after declining four basis points in the previous session.
  • Benchmark yields in the U.K. rose one basis point, after a drop of two basis points Tuesday.
  • Australia 10-year yields fell less than one basis point to 2.39 percent.

Cheerio

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd

Today’s FOREX Trades

EUR/USD Intraday: towards 1.1280.
Pivot: 1.1210

Our preference: long positions above 1.1210 with targets at 1.1265 & 1.1280 in extension.

Alternative scenario: below 1.1210 look for further downside with 1.1170 & 1.1145 as targets.

Comment: the RSI is bullish and calls for further upside.

USD/JPY Intraday: supported by a rising trend line.
Pivot: 111.45

Our preference: long positions above 111.45 with targets at 111.90 & 112.20 in extension.

Alternative scenario: below 111.45 look for further downside with 111.10 & 110.80 as targets.

Comment: the RSI is bullish and calls for further upside.

GBP/USD Intraday: continuation of the rebound.
Pivot: 1.2960

Our preference: long positions above 1.2960 with targets at 1.3005 & 1.3020 in extension.

Alternative scenario: below 1.2960 look for further downside with 1.2925 & 1.2900 as targets.

Comment: the RSI is mixed with a bullish bias.

 

As well as these current currency plays we remain bullish on both gold and silver.

 

Cheerio.

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

 

Short Pound

The pound is heading lower whatever the outcome of the U.K.’s elections, according to BlueBay Asset Management.

While the currency has rallied since the election was called, BlueBay began selling sterling last week, betting that the U.K. is set for a damaging Brexit process after the vote. Such a view chimes with Allianz Global Investors who recently used the rally in the pound to short it, and the median forecast of analysts in a survey, who see the pound declining about 3 percent by the end of 2017.

“We’ve literally gone short the pound at the end of last week,” said Mark Dowding, a fund manager at BlueBay, which oversees $55.5 billion. “We think you’re going to be facing a Brexit that to us looks like it’s going to be a hard Brexit.”

The pound, which tumbled following the U.K.’s decision to leave the European Union last June, has pared some of those losses as investors speculate that the earlier vote will ease pressure on U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May. The Conservatives are currently expected to comfortably win the June 8 snap elections with a large majority in Parliament.

Sterling reached a nine-month high of 1.3048 on May 18, and was at $1.2971 as of 12:06 p.m. in London on Tuesday. Even after rallying 5 percent in 2017, sterling remains about 13 percent weaker since the Brexit vote last June.

“There’s been this optimism in markets that a really big majority may actually strengthen Theresa May’s hand and make life a lot easier,” said Dowding, who predicts sterling could retest $1.20 toward the end of the year — an 8 percent decline from the current levels. “I’m not really sure it will make too much difference in practice.”

Tough comments from both sides of the negotiating table signal a choppy path ahead. Bundesbank board member Andreas Dombret said Tuesday divorce proceedings would likely be hard or very hard. Those comments came shortly after Brexit Secretary David Davis said the U.K. will walk away from talks unless the bloc drops its high financial demands.

“The most significant point that we would make on the U.K. is that, based on our discussions around Westminster and our discussions around Brussels, it feels that the deal that U.K. politicians think they can achieve seems an unrealistic pipe dream,” Dowding said.

Cheerio.

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

Forex Trading Update

We ended up last week with softer than expected April US retail sales and consumer prices. As a result, the US Dollar, which had had a very good week, gave back almost half of its gains of the week.

By the time you are reading this, our week of trading will have already started. Retail sales q/q for New Zealand was out late last night and beat the forecasted figure by 0.4%. Retails sales rose 1.5% against estimate of 1.1% on Q1. China Industrial Production was out at 3am as well and that was y/y release.

Today should be a typical Monday with no news. Traders coming back to their desks and assessing what happened over the weekend and preparing their week ahead. We should experience thin liquidity thanks to no important Fundamental Events happening throughout the day. We only have Theresa May who is Due to participate in Facebook’s Live Q&A hosted by ITV News, via satellite;

Due to Brexit talks which are going not so well at the moment plus a General Election in the UK on June 8th, this speech should affect the British Pound in the morning as investors will have their eyes and ears plugged on any clues the UK Prime minister may give on her plans for Brexit negotiations and the future of the country.

The British Pound is one of the Major currencies which should be most affected this week with CPI Y/Y on Tuesday, Average Earnings Index3m/y on Wednesday and Retail Sales m/m on Thursday. All being released @ 9:30 GMT on their respective days.

France has now its new president Emannuel Macron who was sworn as President yesterday with the difficult task of transforming electoral success into political strength in a society tormented by unemployment and divided by anger.

There is not much to say in terms of fundamentals as the bigger picture haven’t changed much in the past few weeks and the market is quite indecisive at the moment. It looks like the summer doldrums may be starting to have its effects . For the time being the biggest mover is the USD/JPY and that could easily be a “buy the rumours sell the news” run fuelled by the idea that the FED will hike next month at its next meeting.

Cheerio.

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.

FOREX Friday

Friday May 12th will see the release of a set of crucial US data for April at 13:30 BST; retail sales, retail sales excluding autos, CPI and core CPI. Please be aware that it will likely affect USD and USD crosses along with commodities.

The dollar index has rebounded over the past four trading sessions after hitting a low 6-month low of 98.40. Gold prices saw a rebound on Thursday, and has now touched a three-day high of $1228.98 on Friday during early European session.

US retail sales (MoM) saw a downtrend over the past three months mainly caused by the decline in auto and petroleum sales. The consensus for the April figure is an optimistic forecast of 0.6%. However, sales in April for the two automobile tycoons, Ford and GM, saw a further falling of 7.1% and 5.8% respectively. The declines will likely weigh on the upcoming data. US retail sales outlook seems to be a bit gloomy before auto sales see a recovery.

Retail sales excluding autos also saw a downtrend over the past three months with the reading for March falling into zero growth, not seen since August 2016.

US CPI (YoY) has seen a healthy upswing since August 2015; staying above the Fed’s 2% target since December 2016. Core CPI has been oscillating steadily in the range between 2.1% – 2.3% since January 2016.

The Bank of England (BoE) announced that; interest rates remain unchanged at 0.25% and the asset purchase programme also remains unchanged at £435 billion which are both in line with market expectations. The BoE sees inflation to be above their 2% target for the next three years due to weak GBP. Consumption will continue to experience a slowdown; however, this will be balanced by rising trade and investment. Wage growth is expected to be quicker in 2018.

The BoE forecasts interest rates are likely to remain at the current level until late 2019. However, monetary policy may need to be tightened more than the markets expect over the next three years. The BoE also predicts the Brexit process to be smooth.

The BoE holds a positive outlook on inflation and wage growth and overly optimistic about the Brexit negotiation process. The EU is unlikely to make the process easy for the UK, to avoid encouraging other member states leaving following Brexit.

GBP/USD fell from 1.2940 after the UK data was released, holding above the significant support line at 1.2900. This support level was breached following the BoE announcement with GBP/USD hitting a 1-week low of 1.2848.

Cheerio

The Pinstripe and Bowler Club shares information with MF Solutions Ltd.